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Liz’s Cucumber Mint Lime & Ginger Paletas (Ice Lollies)

Liz Earle

Featuring:
Cucumber
Cucumber
Effort:
Complexity:
Cost:
In season now

Serves: 6

Prep time: 10 mins (+ 6 hours chilling time in the freezer)

Ingredients:

Popsicle moulds and wooden sticks

juice of 8 limes


2cm piece of ginger

handful of fresh mint leaves

1 cucumber, sliced

1 tablespoon honey, to taste

water

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Recipe donated by Liz Earle & Love British Food for Veg Power. Photography by Georgia Glynn Smith | glynnsmith.co.uk

Zesty and refreshing, our take on the Mexican frozen pops are just what you need to cool down on a hot summer’s day. Depending on how sweet you want them, add as little or as much honey as required to these cucumber mint lime & ginger paletas.

Method:

Firstly, set your wooden sticks in warm water (if using them).

Squeeze the juice of 8 limes and dilute with water (depending how zesty you want your paletas!).

Grate in the fresh ginger, add in the fresh mint leaves and sweeten with honey.

Place a few slices of cucumber into your popsicle moulds and pour in the citrusy mix.

Allow to freeze for half an hour then add in the wooden sticks, before returning to the freezer for at least a further 6 hours.

Engaging Kids

Engaging Kids

Kids who engage regularly with veg through veg-themed activities, such as arts and crafts, sensory experiences, growing and cooking are shown to be more likely to eat the veg they engage with. Encouraging kids to engage and play with veg is the handy first step to them developing a good relationship with veg and life-long healthy eating.

Kids in the kitchen

Kids in the kitchen

These can be pretty much made by the kids, although small fingers may need some help grating the ginger, and you might need to supervise how much honey they use for sweetening. Then all that’s left is for them to be patient while the paletas freeze.

Activities

Activities

While getting kids to interact with veggies for real and using their senses to explore them is best, encouraging hands off activities like arts & crafts, puzzles & games or at-home science experiments can be a great start, particularly for those who are fussier eaters or struggle with anything too sensory. Use these veg-themed activities as a stepping stone to interacting with the veg themselves. We have loads of crafty downloads here, puzzles here, and quirky science with veg here.

Sensory

Sensory

Once you feel your child is ready to engage a little more, you can show them how to explore the veg you have on hand with their senses, coming up with playful silly descriptions of how a veg smells, feels, looks, sounds and perhaps even tastes. Find ideas, videos and some simple sensory education session ideas to get you started here.

Serving

Serving

The moments before food is offered can be a perfect opportunity for engagement that can help make it more likely a child will eat it! Giving children a sense of ownership in the meal can make a big difference to their feelings going into it and the pride they take in it. You know your child best, but if you aren’t sure where to start, we have some fun and simple ideas for easy roles you can give them in the serving process over here.

Liz Earle

Liz Earle MBE is an entrepreneur, presenter and bestselling author of 35+ books. She is a contributor to This Morning, and co-founded brands including the Liz Earle Beauty Co. and Liz Earle Wellbeing.

uk.lizearle.com/

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